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Blogs about conferences

Things that Matter To Me As a Speaker.

3.20.2017

Beyond the basics such as an enforced code of conduct and covered travel and lodging, there are a few things that I really appreciate as a speaker:

Real Talk About Conference Speaking.

12.20.2016

Not to be a downer, but that "free" trip you got by having your conference talk accepted is pretty far from free. TANSTAAFL, and all that. Here some additional "costs" you may have to consider. (Organizers: think about the huge commitment your speakers are making when they agree to speak. Try to make things as easy for them as possible.)

Related:

How I Got Involved With CascadiaFest.

9.12.2016

I feel very lucky to have been invited to organize CascadiaFest for the past two years - first as Browser (JavaScript) Day Curator, and this year as CSS Day Curator. Sometimes people have asked me how I got involved with CascadiaFest in the first place, so I thought I'd tell that story.

Way back in 2013, I decided that it would be good for my professional development to attend some conferences. I had just started a new job, with some savings left over from unemployment time, and so I had some budget to attend conferences on my own dime. I had met Carter Rabasa (founder and long-time organizer of CascadiaJS) by attending the SeattleJS meetup in the previous year. So I arranged a trip to Vancouver, BC for CascadiaJS in November. On the Hacker Train up from Seattle to Vancouver, I met Tracy Hinds, who had organized the Hacker Train all the way up from Portland.

CascadiaJS 2013 was an absolute blast. The talks were interesting and educational, and I met a bunch of new (and now long-time) conf-friends and even got mistaken for a speaker! I followed new friends on Twitter, and CascadiaJS on Github. Not too long after coming home, I wrote up and posted some of my notes and published them on this blog. I knew I would be ready to do it again in 2014.

And I did. CascadiaJS 2014 was in Portland, and I bought a ticket and lodging nice and early. Beyond being excited about attending, I had even begun to think I might be able to speak. I had even submitted a talk. It was pretty awful, but that's the first step. 2014 was just as wonderful as the last year - I made sure to thank Tracy and Carter (head organizers for that year) personally, since I knew it was a ton of work to organize something so big and so lovely. (Organizing a conference is kinda like organizing a wedding, once a year.) Since I followed the CascadiaJS repo, I was able to observe many parts of the organization process, and contributed some (hopefully!) helpful thoughts for the next year.

By early 2015, I'd had some success with my talk proposals, and had managed to speak at 2 other conferences. Thus I felt qualified to help other people with their talk proposals and I volunteered to do so; and also to help with CFP out-reach - something I feel passionate about. But Tracy responded asking would I be interested in becoming a core organizer and curating JavaScript Day? After only a little thought, I responded "absolutely yes"!

So, there you go. I got involved by attending first, providing useful feedback to the organizers, and participating in the community.

How a Code of Conduct Works.

6.29.2016

Bottom line - your events (from meetup to conference) and even your open source projects need a code of conduct. What is a code of conduct?

Let me tell you precisely how a code of conduct works to change interactions during an event.

Last year, I attended a conference as a workshop volunteer. After the workshop, a speaker from the previous day wanted to ask me some follow-up questions about the workshop. While he spoke a little English, he wanted me to step outside to the plaza where his translator was. I agreed.

Let's review the power dynamic here: me = unimportant volunteer, him = very important speaker.

He was from a country where (I suppose), it's common for men to escort women by leading them by the elbow. While we were walking outside, he put his hand on my elbow, and I (being perfectly capable of finding the doors outside) removed it. He again put his hand on my elbow and tried to lead me towards the door. I again removed it, and looked him directly in the eyes and said "no". I then stomped through the doors and found the translator. With the help of the translator, the speaker apologized if he had offended me. I said that I was fine and I answered his questions from the workshop.

Here is how the conference's code of conduct worked: I knew that - regardless of any power imbalance - the conference had my back. I was empowered to enforce my own boundaries and I did so. I was a bit irritated by the incident, but I took care of it myself. Situation resolved, no escalation, no problem. That's how a code of conduct works.

What I'm Looking For in a Talk Proposal.

5.22.2016

I'm curating CSS Day at CascadiaFest this year, and earlier this month we finished our speaker selection process. Since I've evaluated hundreds and hundreds of proposals for CascadiaFest, I thought I'd share what I'm looking for when I evaluate a talk proposal. At CascadiaFest, our selection process is masked; we do most of the evaluation before revealing the identity of the person who wrote the proposal. (Though it's sometimes possible to guess who has submitted the talk.) Naturally these thoughts are only about my process, and do not represent any other curators or selection committee members.

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