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CascadiaJS 2014 Talk Notes.

8.27.2014

This year's CascadiaJS was in Portland. The weather was unusually hot, but it was a great conference!

Technology as a Means to Equality - Willow Brugh

Everything you never wanted to know about maps - Patrick Arlt

Contributors wanted: encouraging diversity in your open source project - Kate Hudson

How To Run A Successful Local User Group - Jason Campbell

GIFs vs Web Components - Glen Maddern

Decisions, Open Source, Graph Theory, and Static Analysis - Charlie Robbins

ReInventing the Wheel (The Magic of Custom Event Emitters) - Nick Niemeir

Your Website is Not Accessible - Alex Qin

Bookmarklets FTW: The Case for Bookmarklets in Everyday Life - Lydia Katsamberis

Practical Optimization for v8(is it okay to write JavaScript yet?) - David Manning

Writing Robot Plays: NodeJS, Reddit, and The Aesthetics of Unwitting Participation - Joe Lepper

Embracing Failure - Soledad Penadés

Cat-DNS: a DNS server that resolves everything to cats - Monica Dinculescu

ARIA Was Made For This: Accessibility of JavaScript MVCs - Marcy Sutton

Constantly Losing Stuff: Lessons learned developing and using continuation-local-storage in Node - Forrest Norvell

AllNightRave.js - Floh Herra-Vega

Making JavaScript Tests Fast, Easy, and Friendly - Ryan Roemer

Barriers to Entry - Ruth Baril

Hash Functions Taste Great with Anything - Curtis Lassam

Node.js for fun, profit and Whiskey - Jim Heising

Hacking Mentor.js - Marlena Compton & Ryan Dy

Put A Database On It! - Bryce Baril

A Story About NodeSchool and Community Building - Jason Rhodes

No More Unicorns - CJ Silverio

Amusing Content Generators.

8.17.2014

If the previous collection of content generators was a little too straight laced, check out these hipper ways to generate placeholder content images and copy.

Q&A Anti-Patterns.

8.5.2014

Here are some patterns to post-speech question and answer sessions that really ought to be avoided.

In fact, it seems like the vast majority of questions asked at these times are a waste of time to everyone but the asker. Thank you to those who organize sessions with questions via Twitter or "at the pool" only.

Messages to a Girl.

7.22.2014

Watch this video of some messages a girl hears while growing up. Please watch it.

Here's a rough transcript of the messages she hears growing up:

"Who's my pretty girl?"

"Sammi sweetie, don't get your dress dirty."

"Sam, honey, you don't want to mess with that. Let's put it down."

"Samantha, this project has gotten out of control."

"Whoa, hey, careful with that. Why don't you hand that to your brother?"

Is it any wonder that she goes for the lipstick instead of the science fair? A lifetime of small changes can have huge results.

Additionally, here's an article about the creation of this video.

Content Generators (Serious).

7.12.2014

Do you need some temporary copy or images? What a coincidence - here is a collection of sites which will generate placeholder images or content for you.

Internet of Things "Hack and Tell" Review.

7.2.2014

Last week I went to an "Internet of Things Hack and Tell" at the Makerhaus in Fremont. The event was quite well attended; by my count there were over 80 people there. The hackathon was cleaned right out of sponsored pizza; I was glad I'd already had pre-meetup sushi. There is clearly enough interest here in Seattle to support a Nodebots group.

It was interesting to see all of the projects shown at the event. Here's a rundown of what was demoed:

For the record, many projects were only talked about. Some were too large to mobilize, some were missing parts ("the motor arrives tomorrow"), and some presentations were just a slideshow.

My apologies to those folks whose name / URL I did not get. A couple of folks were given Intel's Arduino-compatible board - the Galileo - at the conclusion of the event. Very jealous!

CSS Hacks.

6.21.2014

In the past, I've used CSS hacks * and _ as a quick and dirty way to make a few CSS changes for IE6 and IE7 only , while preferring conditional comments for larger scale adjustments.

When IE8 came out, developers used another CSS hack (\9;) to target just IE8. But when IE9 came out, it also rendered \9; hacks, which made it the perfect example of an unsafe CSS hack.

Since then, things have only gotten messier for CSS hacks. There are tons of new browsers out there, and IE10 was the last IE to support conditional comments. While CSS selectors still remain fairly ugly, sometimes they're just the tool you need. Fortunately, Browserhacks has pulled all the hacks from all over the internet into one place. And it's on GitHub - so you can add to it.