Pew Pew Laser Blog

Code. Glass art. Games. Baking. Cats. From Seattle, Washington and various sundry satellite locations.

Blogs about speaking

Advice for Speaking.

5.16.2017

Here is a collection of some of the best pieces of advice for speaking at a conference that I've given and received over the last year:

Here are some HTML-based slideshows frameworks that you can use:

More advice:

Things that Matter To Me As a Speaker.

3.20.2017

Beyond the basics such as an enforced code of conduct and covered travel and lodging, there are a few things that I really appreciate as a speaker:

Real Talk About Conference Speaking.

12.20.2016

Not to be a downer, but that "free" trip you got by having your conference talk accepted is pretty far from free. TANSTAAFL, and all that. Here some additional "costs" you may have to consider. (Organizers: think about the huge commitment your speakers are making when they agree to speak. Try to make things as easy for them as possible.)

Related:

How a Code of Conduct Works.

6.29.2016

Bottom line - your events (from meetup to conference) and even your open source projects need a code of conduct. What is a code of conduct?

Let me tell you precisely how a code of conduct works to change interactions during an event.

Last year, I attended a conference as a workshop volunteer. After the workshop, a speaker from the previous day wanted to ask me some follow-up questions about the workshop. While he spoke a little English, he wanted me to step outside to the plaza where his translator was. I agreed.

Let's review the power dynamic here: me = unimportant volunteer, him = very important speaker.

He was from a country where (I suppose), it's common for men to escort women by leading them by the elbow. While we were walking outside, he put his hand on my elbow, and I (being perfectly capable of finding the doors outside) removed it. He again put his hand on my elbow and tried to lead me towards the door. I again removed it, and looked him directly in the eyes and said "no". I then stomped through the doors and found the translator. With the help of the translator, the speaker apologized if he had offended me. I said that I was fine and I answered his questions from the workshop.

Here is how the conference's code of conduct worked: I knew that - regardless of any power imbalance - the conference had my back. I was empowered to enforce my own boundaries and I did so. I was a bit irritated by the incident, but I took care of it myself. Situation resolved, no escalation, no problem. That's how a code of conduct works.

What I'm Looking For in a Talk Proposal.

5.22.2016

I'm curating CSS Day at CascadiaFest this year, and earlier this month we finished our speaker selection process. Since I've evaluated hundreds and hundreds of proposals for CascadiaFest, I thought I'd share what I'm looking for when I evaluate a talk proposal. At CascadiaFest, our selection process is masked; we do most of the evaluation before revealing the identity of the person who wrote the proposal. (Though it's sometimes possible to guess who has submitted the talk.) Naturally these thoughts are only about my process, and do not represent any other curators or selection committee members.

More blogs about speaking: